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Murray Valley encephalitis: summer is over but mosquito-borne disease remains a risk in northern Australia

Murray Valley encephalitis: summer is over but mosquito-borne disease remains a risk in northern Australia

encierro/ShutterstockCooler temperatures are fading our memories of summer and reducing numbers of mosquitoes in southern parts of Australia. But up north, warmer temperatures and plenty of rain will keep mosquitoes active. While their bites are annoying, more concerning is the diseases mosquitoes carry. Health authorities have recently warned local ...
Australia is playing catch-up with the Future Made in Australia Act. Will it be enough?

Australia is playing catch-up with the Future Made in Australia Act. Will it be enough?

IM Imagery/ShutterstockAustralia is a trading nation. Its economy relies on a strong and open global trade environment. Australian governments have historically rejected protectionist industrial policies that undermine fair competition, and Canberra has long been a staunch advocate of the World Trade Organization, whose rules help “promote and protect the
The politics of recognition: Australia and the question of Palestinian statehood

The politics of recognition: Australia and the question of Palestinian statehood

What is the significance of the Australian government signalling this week that it may finally recognise Palestinian statehood? Though not universally popular, Foreign Minister Penny Wong’s diplomatic gesture towards Palestinian statehood has been welcomed in some quarters as a departure from Australia’s longstanding bipartisan consensus on the Middle East.
The Petrov affair: how a real-life Cold War defection became a soothing spy story for anxious Australians

The Petrov affair: how a real-life Cold War defection became a soothing spy story for anxious Australians

This year marks 70 years since Soviet diplomat Vladimir Petrov sensationally defected to Australia shortly before the 1954 election, beginning what came to be known as the “Petrov affair”. The defection itself is interesting – but what’s equally fascinating is how the Australian media covered the Petrov affair. The story

Murray Valley encephalitis: summer is over but mosquito-borne disease remains a risk in northern Australia

Murray Valley encephalitis: summer is over but mosquito-borne disease remains a risk in northern Australia
encierro/ShutterstockCooler temperatures are fading our memories of summer and reducing numbers of mosquitoes in southern parts of Australia. But up north, warmer temperatures and plenty of rain will keep mosquitoes active. While their bites are annoying, more concerning is the diseases mosquitoes carry. Health authorities have recently warned local ...

Australia is playing catch-up with the Future Made in Australia Act. Will it be enough?

Australia is playing catch-up with the Future Made in Australia Act. Will it be enough?
IM Imagery/ShutterstockAustralia is a trading nation. Its economy relies on a strong and open global trade environment. Australian governments have historically rejected protectionist industrial policies that undermine fair competition, and Canberra has long been a staunch advocate of the World Trade Organization, whose rules help “promote and protect the

The politics of recognition: Australia and the question of Palestinian statehood

The politics of recognition: Australia and the question of Palestinian statehood
What is the significance of the Australian government signalling this week that it may finally recognise Palestinian statehood? Though not universally popular, Foreign Minister Penny Wong’s diplomatic gesture towards Palestinian statehood has been welcomed in some quarters as a departure from Australia’s longstanding bipartisan consensus on the Middle East.

The Petrov affair: how a real-life Cold War defection became a soothing spy story for anxious Australians

The Petrov affair: how a real-life Cold War defection became a soothing spy story for anxious Australians
This year marks 70 years since Soviet diplomat Vladimir Petrov sensationally defected to Australia shortly before the 1954 election, beginning what came to be known as the “Petrov affair”. The defection itself is interesting – but what’s equally fascinating is how the Australian media covered the Petrov affair. The story