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Oil and water

Oil and water

Sonia Backès, the leading conservative anti-independence politician of her generation in New Caledonia, believes that — like “oil and water” — Kanak cannot mix with non-Kanak. The two groups have “insurmountable antagonisms,” the Southern Province president argued during a major speech on 14 July. Backès heads a coalition of conservative
Upwardly mobile

Upwardly mobile

With its 830 distinct languages, Papua New Guinea is the most linguistically diverse nation in the world. Perhaps that’s because, as some argue, small groups deliberately maintained their identities with distinct languages. Or perhaps it reflects the country’s topographical features — the steep mountain ranges, wide rivers and dense forests
Long night in Milwaukee

Long night in Milwaukee

On Thursday night, less than a week after surviving an assassination attempt, Donald Trump, Republican presidential nominee for the third time, was introduced to the Republican delegates alternatively as a loving and devoted family man and as a visionary fighter and leader protected by divine intervention. It was the culmination
CFMEU’s cartel question

CFMEU’s cartel question

In a story reminiscent of Jimmy Hoffa’s International Brotherhood of Teamsters, the allegations of corruption in the Construction, Forestry and Maritime Employees Union just keep on coming from the Nine papers. It’s all there: kickbacks, organised crime, wads of cash passing under a table and high levels of political intrigue
Gaslighting America

Gaslighting America

“As things stand right now,” the conservative Heritage Foundation’s Mike Howell declared last week, “there’s zero chance of a free and fair election. I’m formally accusing the Biden administration of creating the conditions that most reasonable policy-makers and officials cannot in good conscience certify an election.” Howell’s words are part
American innocence

American innocence

“And what do we all say? Be good, be kind, be brave, be different. Good day sun, good day sunshine.” Songwriter Tim Minchin sets these words to a catchy little tune with a real swing in the alluring introduction to the limited series Eric (Netflix). The series opens in a
Beware “the vibe”

Beware “the vibe”

Who will win the 2024 American presidential election? A lot of people seem to think it’s done and dusted. Betting markets, while never the predictor many have hyped them as, do neatly summarise expectations, and on Thursday morning a random online outfit had an implied 69 per cent chance of
Reframing Gauguin

Reframing Gauguin

Coinciding with the new blockbuster show, Gauguin’s World: Tōna Iho, Tōna Ao, at the National Gallery of Australia, Nicholas Thomas’s latest book offers a provocative perspective on two of Paul Gauguin’s most abiding themes — women and Polynesia. By far the most famous of the Frenchman’s paintings feature the women
History’s burdens

History’s burdens

Labor’s complex relationship with Palestine — its in-principle support for a Palestinian state versus its ties to an Israel of the party’s imagination that no longer exists — has been decades in the making. History hangs heavy on Labor’s relationship with Israel. Its foundational support for Israel; its traditional ties
The whisper in the west

The whisper in the west

Glenn Druery is one smart cookie. Having long ago mastered the art of harvesting preferences under the old group-voting option on upper house ballot papers, and having perfected the schmoozing needed to convince aspiring upper house members to fund his lotteries, he’s also picked up useful insights into how political
How Kamala Harris can win

How Kamala Harris can win

After many years of defending Joe Biden and his approach to politics, often in the face of naysayers who said his belief in bipartisanship and norms was antiquated, I joined Team Pass-the-Torch in my most recent column for Washington Monthly. Yet so far this week we’re seeing more Democratic energy going towards

Oil and water

Oil and water
Sonia Backès, the leading conservative anti-independence politician of her generation in New Caledonia, believes that — like “oil and water” — Kanak cannot mix with non-Kanak. The two groups have “insurmountable antagonisms,” the Southern Province president argued during a major speech on 14 July. Backès heads a coalition of conservative

Upwardly mobile

Upwardly mobile
With its 830 distinct languages, Papua New Guinea is the most linguistically diverse nation in the world. Perhaps that’s because, as some argue, small groups deliberately maintained their identities with distinct languages. Or perhaps it reflects the country’s topographical features — the steep mountain ranges, wide rivers and dense forests

Long night in Milwaukee

Long night in Milwaukee
On Thursday night, less than a week after surviving an assassination attempt, Donald Trump, Republican presidential nominee for the third time, was introduced to the Republican delegates alternatively as a loving and devoted family man and as a visionary fighter and leader protected by divine intervention. It was the culmination

CFMEU’s cartel question

CFMEU’s cartel question
In a story reminiscent of Jimmy Hoffa’s International Brotherhood of Teamsters, the allegations of corruption in the Construction, Forestry and Maritime Employees Union just keep on coming from the Nine papers. It’s all there: kickbacks, organised crime, wads of cash passing under a table and high levels of political intrigue

Gaslighting America

Gaslighting America
“As things stand right now,” the conservative Heritage Foundation’s Mike Howell declared last week, “there’s zero chance of a free and fair election. I’m formally accusing the Biden administration of creating the conditions that most reasonable policy-makers and officials cannot in good conscience certify an election.” Howell’s words are part

American innocence

American innocence
“And what do we all say? Be good, be kind, be brave, be different. Good day sun, good day sunshine.” Songwriter Tim Minchin sets these words to a catchy little tune with a real swing in the alluring introduction to the limited series Eric (Netflix). The series opens in a

Beware “the vibe”

Beware “the vibe”
Who will win the 2024 American presidential election? A lot of people seem to think it’s done and dusted. Betting markets, while never the predictor many have hyped them as, do neatly summarise expectations, and on Thursday morning a random online outfit had an implied 69 per cent chance of

Reframing Gauguin

Reframing Gauguin
Coinciding with the new blockbuster show, Gauguin’s World: Tōna Iho, Tōna Ao, at the National Gallery of Australia, Nicholas Thomas’s latest book offers a provocative perspective on two of Paul Gauguin’s most abiding themes — women and Polynesia. By far the most famous of the Frenchman’s paintings feature the women

History’s burdens

History’s burdens
Labor’s complex relationship with Palestine — its in-principle support for a Palestinian state versus its ties to an Israel of the party’s imagination that no longer exists — has been decades in the making. History hangs heavy on Labor’s relationship with Israel. Its foundational support for Israel; its traditional ties

The whisper in the west

The whisper in the west
Glenn Druery is one smart cookie. Having long ago mastered the art of harvesting preferences under the old group-voting option on upper house ballot papers, and having perfected the schmoozing needed to convince aspiring upper house members to fund his lotteries, he’s also picked up useful insights into how political

How Kamala Harris can win

How Kamala Harris can win
After many years of defending Joe Biden and his approach to politics, often in the face of naysayers who said his belief in bipartisanship and norms was antiquated, I joined Team Pass-the-Torch in my most recent column for Washington Monthly. Yet so far this week we’re seeing more Democratic energy going towards