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Two apology days and no action

Two apology days and no action

On May 26, 1997 the final report of the National Inquiry into the Separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children from Their Families, called the Bringing Them Home report, was tabled in Parliament. The report proposed a list of 54 recommendations, including  for the Prime Minister to issue a formal apology

Pride and Nationalism in the colony

Aussie Pride. A beauty to behold in all its forms; lamb ads, green and gold school uniforms on our Olympians, 2GB and a casual small protest/riot at a Meanjin woolies.  Despite national pride being something that every so-called Australian should be expected to feel, the nationalism of white Australia is
Shifting Attitudes to Invasion Day Give Me Hope

Shifting Attitudes to Invasion Day Give Me Hope

Growing up in the early 1990s, Australia Day celebrations were everywhere. It was a huge commodity largely felt through the local community, school, and social circles. There was intense pressure to engage in this day through activities promoting an empty patriotism that pressed against a legacy of genocide. My family

Two apology days and no action

Two apology days and no action
On May 26, 1997 the final report of the National Inquiry into the Separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children from Their Families, called the Bringing Them Home report, was tabled in Parliament. The report proposed a list of 54 recommendations, including  for the Prime Minister to issue a formal apology

Pride and Nationalism in the colony

Aussie Pride. A beauty to behold in all its forms; lamb ads, green and gold school uniforms on our Olympians, 2GB and a casual small protest/riot at a Meanjin woolies.  Despite national pride being something that every so-called Australian should be expected to feel, the nationalism of white Australia is

Shifting Attitudes to Invasion Day Give Me Hope

Shifting Attitudes to Invasion Day Give Me Hope
Growing up in the early 1990s, Australia Day celebrations were everywhere. It was a huge commodity largely felt through the local community, school, and social circles. There was intense pressure to engage in this day through activities promoting an empty patriotism that pressed against a legacy of genocide. My family